Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Personal Illustrations some re-drawn for Bush Craft 101

These are some of my personal illustrations drawn before the publishing of Bush Craft 101

Ax Mask Design

Blade Profiles Traditional

Standard Blade Grinds

Notch Stick used in Pioneering Class

Basic Bedroll

Pack Strap Mod for Bedroll

Belt Ax Designs

Bow Saws

Kindling Splits with an Ax

Measuring Tree Height using a measuring device

Felling Cuts

Wood Processing for Fire Wood

Leather Fishing Kit

Proper use of Forks for Cooksets


Judging Height with angles

Split Stick Rotisserie

Pack Frame

Safe Knife Grip

Safe Position for splitting with an Ax

Set the teeth on a Saw

Ax head Nomenclatures

Cooking on Stone

Splitting without an Ax

Spoon Pattern

Tarp fold for gear storage on Improvised Pack Frames

Alcohol Stove Cut Away 

Splitting a Log with Wedges

9 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Unique Outdoor Survival Skills

      Don't you find it ironic that even with all this scandalously expensive education, people today know so little?

      If they can't even fix their car, how are they supposed to handle a - let's say - long term food shortage?

      You can't possibly hope they'd know how to garden and produce their own food, save seeds for next year, and use leaves plowed under to fertilize the soil.

      Not to mention trapping, catching, skinning and cooking a rabbit...

      These may seem advanced outdoor survival skills now, but back in the days, they were merely called "Living".

      Watch this short video now and discover a set of unique and fantastic survival skills used and perfected by our ancestors.

      Don't wait for the next crisis to hit and live to regret you had the chance to learn these skills but didn't.

      Click here to watch video!

      Thanks again.









      .

      Delete
  2. these are great drawings. really reminds of jaeger's book.

    ReplyDelete
  3. gives lots of ideas Dave....thanks

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Dave, I'm a huge fan/supporter of yours...literally.... I stand 6'8" tall, and I'm having difficulty finding a way to carry my oversized Czech Military sleep system shelter element efficiently in my Alice Pack frame setup. It takes up most of the entire pack when put inside, vertically or horizontally... and when attached to the bottom on the outside it is simply too bulky and interferes with cadence. I know that sleeping is one of the most important aspects of bushcraft, and I'd like to know your thoughts in general on the Czech surplus sleeping bags. I saw your D-ring picture concept and I'm wondering what you recommend...should I switch to a more traditional wool blanket bedroll situation? Or try to find a quality M.S.S. with a dry bag that compresses better to allow for more compact gear space? Or is the Alice Pack the wrong type of setup for giants to begin with?

    Thank you for your inspiration, I love my Pocket Hunter and Bush knife I recently purchased from the Pathfinder store. Looking forward to new videos, the weaving series is awesome, and vital. -Mike Chappelle, Virginia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure what the weather is like where you are in a hard winter, the MMS is the best bet for really cold below "0" weather, but wool will keep you warm above that with the right camp setup easy enough, have you tried a hammock and tarp with a single heavy bag and under-quilt?

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your reply Dave, the winters out here near Colonial Williamsburg are generally mild, it seldom goes below zero. So I have been getting away with a foam ground pad and the MMS system for now, carrying it efficiently with room for the other C's of survivability are my main concerns. Just feels like I'm doing something wrong by having it take up 90% of the inside of the pack.

      I haven't tried a hammock yet but that is a great idea as the wet ground conditions are usually a hassle out this way..humid summers and rapid changing jet stream cold wet winter conditions. I think I will get a Pathfinder Duluth pack eventually, and switch to 100% wool as per your videos either way. Army surplus gear has way too many pockets for my liking, but I do like the ALICE straps, they are very versatile. Thanks for taking the time to reply to my message! Hope you and your family have a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Mike

      Delete
  5. Hi Dave,

    This are really nice drawings. Thanks for sharring this. I do also share a lote survival/bushcraft skills on a Dutch website. woodcraftsurvival.com

    Kind regards Michel

    ReplyDelete
  6. Unique Outdoor Survival Skills

    Don't you find it ironic that even with all this scandalously expensive education, people today know so little?

    If they can't even fix their car, how are they supposed to handle a - let's say - long term food shortage?

    You can't possibly hope they'd know how to garden and produce their own food, save seeds for next year, and use leaves plowed under to fertilize the soil.

    Not to mention trapping, catching, skinning and cooking a rabbit...

    These may seem advanced outdoor survival skills now, but back in the days, they were merely called "Living".

    Watch this short video now and discover a set of unique and fantastic survival skills used and perfected by our ancestors.

    Don't wait for the next crisis to hit and live to regret you had the chance to learn these skills but didn't.

    Click here to watch video!

    Thanks again.









    .

    ReplyDelete